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Vintage Crochet Stitches
from
D.M.C. 1886

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEEDLEWORK
BY TH. DE DILLMONT
D.M.C. LIBRARY

CROCHET STITCHES and INSTRUCTIONS
Explanation of the signs *.-- In crochet, as in kniting, it is often necessary to repeat a whole series of stitches. Such repetitions will be indicated by one, two, three or more asterisks, *, **, ***, &c., as required.
STITCHES
In Point of fact, there is only one stitch, because all crochet work consists of loops made by means of the little hook, and connected together by being drawn one though the other.


Position of the hands


Single Stitch or Small Close Stitch
Put the hook, from the rigght side of the work, through the upper half either of a chain stitch or a stitch of the row below, take hols of the thread and draw it through both the loop of the row below and that which is on the hook, and which proceeds from the last stitch.
This stitch is also known as "slip" stitch.


Plain or Close Stitch
Put the hook, as shown above from the right side to the wrong, through the top loop of a preceding row, take hold of the thread, draw it through the first loop. twist the thread over the hook and draw it through the two loops.
In many crochet manuels this stitch will be found under the name of "double" crochet.
As will be seen by the following illustrations and descriptions, all kinds of variations in crochet can be produced by different methods of arranging these simple stitches.


Rose Stitch


Russian Stitch
Russian stitch This is worked like the foregoing, only that all the rows have to be begun from the same end, and the thread has to be cut off at the end of each row.


Ribbed Stitch.
Worked backwards and forwards, the hook being passed through the back part only of the stitches of the preceding row.


Slanting Stitch.
Worked entirely on the right side. Take up the back thread of a stitch in the preceding row, take hold of the crochet thread without turning it round the needle and draw it through in a loop, and then finish the stitch like a plain stitch.


Russian Crossed Stitch
To work this stitch which runs in slanting lines, put the needle in between the vertical threads of the stitches and underneath the two horizontal ones.


Counterpane Stitch.
Counterpanes can be made in a less close stitch than those just described.
To produce a soft and elastic fabric turn the thread round the needle and insert it under both the horizontal threads of a loop, take up the thread without turning it round the needle, draw it through in a loop, make an over, and draw the thread through all the three loops, that you have on the needle.


Knotted Stitch.
Make an over, put the needle through the two horizontal threads of the stitch below, make another over and draw it back through the two loops and the first over, make another over, and draw the thread through the last two loops.


Loop Stitch


Plain Stitches for a Chain


Half Trebles Drawn Through the Whole Stitch


Plain Trebles Drawn Through Half a Stitch


Double Trebles Passed through a Half Stitch


Triple Trebles Passed Through the Whole Stitch


Connected Trebles.
Trebles, connected together, can be worked to and fro, and take the place of plain stitches. Begin with a chain, then make a treble of the required height, form as many loops as you made overs for the treble, take up the upper thread of the stitch nearest the treble, turn the thread round the needle, bring it back to the right side and draw the needle through the trebles, two at a time.


Connected Trebles, One Above the Other
Trebles of this sort produce an open stitch, which is often used for the footing of lace, or for an insertion. Make a foundation of chain, or other stitches, and proceed as follows: 3 chain, miss 2 stitches of the row beneath, make 1 treble in the third stitch, 5 chain, 1 over, put the needle in between the loops of the connected trebles and finish with a treble. Then make a double over, put the needle into the next loop of the preceding row, make another over, draw the needle through the loops, make another over and join the two next loops. This leaves 3 loops on the needle. Make an over, put the needle into the third stitch of the row beneath, make an over, and bring the needle back to the right side.


Connected Trebles, Set Between Those of the Row Beneath
Join the 5 loops on the needle together, 2 and 2, make 2 chain, 1 over, put the needle into the upper parts of the connected trebles and finish with a treble, and so on.
These trebles also can be lengthened if necessary, but in that case, the width of the crossed treble must correspond with the height. Generally speaking you make the trebles over the same number of stitches as you made overs on the needle, which should always be an even number.


Trebles for a Chain


Bullion Stitch Plain


Bullion Stitch Trebles


Cluster or Pine-apple Stitch
Generally used as an insertion between rows of plain crochet.
Put the needle under one stitch of the preceding row, make an over, draw the thread through in a loop, make another over, put the needle in again under the same stitch, bring it back, make a third over, and pass a third time under the same stitch; bring the needle back, make a fourth over and pass the needle through all the loops that are upon it.
Then, after making a chain stitch, begin the same stitch over again, placing it in the second stitch of the lower row.
Cluster stitch may also be finished off by retaining the two last loops on the needle, making an over, and ending with a plain stitch.



Double Stitch
A rather coarse thread, such as Coton à tricoter D.M.C Nos. 6 to 12, Cordonnet 6 fils D.M.C Nos. 3 to 10, or Fil à pointer D.M.C Nos. 10 to 30 is better for this stitch than a loose fleecy thread which is apt to render it indistinct. Take up a loop right and left of a stitch of the preceding row, so that counting the loop of the last stitch, you have 3 loops on the needle, make an over and draw it through the 3 loops. Then take up a loop again by the side of the one you made on the left, and which now lies on the right. Take 2 loops in the next stitch, make an over and draw it through all the loops.


Raised Stitch with Alternating Trebles
All the stitches that come under this heading require a foundation of a few plain rows for the raised trebles. In fig, you will observe that the fourth stitch in the fourth row is a double treble, connected with a loop of the fourth stitch of the first row.
Miss the stitch of the preceding row, which is hidden under the treble, make 3 plain stitches, 1 double treble, and so on.
Having finished this row, turn the work and make a plain row. In the next row begin with 4 plain stitches, then make 1 double treble between the 3 stitches that are between the first trebles, 3 plain stitches, 2 double trebles and so on.
In the 8th row of plain stitches, the trebles must be placed in the same order as in the 4th.



Raised Stitch with Crossed Trebles


Raised Stitch with Alternating Dots in Pine-apple Stitch
After making 3 plain rows, begin the 4th with 3 plain stitches, and proceed as follows: * 6 trebles into the 4th plain stitch of the preceding row, leaving the last loop of each treble on the needle, so that altogether you have 7 loops upon it; then you turn the thread once round the needle and draw it through the loops; miss the stitch that is underneath the dot, make 3 plain stitches and repeat from *.
Then make 3 rows of plain stitches; in the 4th row, the 1st dot is made in the 4th stitch, so that the dots stand out in relief.


Raised Stitch with Alternating Dots of Trebles


Raised Stitch with Dots in Pine-apple Stitch Set Obliquely
This pretty stitch which can only be worked in rows, all one way, is more especially suitable for children's jackets and petticoats; it is easy, and has the merit of being quickly done. On a foundation of chain, or other stitches, make: 2 chain, 7 trebles on the 4th stitch, * 1 chain, 7 trebles on the 5th stitch of the last row and repeat from *.


Close Shell Stitch


Drooping Picots


Lace Picots Worked Free


Lace Picots Worked on and Edge


Picots with Edging of Trebles

Taken From
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NEEDLEWORK
BY TH. DE DILLMONT
D.M.C. LIBRARY


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VINTAGE CROCHET STITCH INDEX

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